Home Unemployment Rate by State

Unemployment Rate by State

PA Unemployment

NC Unemployment

NC Unemployment

The Bureau of Labor Statistics is the division of the Department of Labor that is responsible for compiling information about unemployment throughout the nation. The Bureau does this in two ways the first is by examining information about statewide employment statistics as well as compiling information which focuses on the labor market in major metropolitan areas. 

In the case of North Carolina, the major metropolitan areas for which information about unemployment in NC are gathered are:

·         the Asheville, NC metropolitan area,

·         the Burlington, NC metropolitan area,

·         the Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill, NC-SC metropolitan area,

·         the Durham-Chapel Hill, NC metropolitan area,

·         the Fayetteville, NC metropolitan area,

·         the Goldsboro, NC metropolitan area,

·         the Greensboro-High Point, NC metropolitan area,

·         the Greenville, NC metropolitan area,

·         the Hickory-Lenoir-Morganton, NC metropolitan area,

·         the Jacksonville, NC metropolitan area,

·         the Raleigh-Cary, NC metropolitan area,

·         the Rocky Mount, NC metropolitan area,

·         the Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC metropolitan area,

·         the Wilmington, NC metropolitan area,

·         and the Winston- Salem, NC metropolitan area.

Unemployment in NC is obviously influenced by the economic realities in surrounding areas. This is why it is impossible for the Bureau of Labor Statistics to compile an accurate report on NC unemployment issues without taking into account factors from the surrounding region. As best as the Bureau can determine, however, the civilian labor force in the state over the six month period from March 2010 to August 2010 dropped from 4,564,000 individuals in March to 4,492,000 individuals, with the NC unemployment rate dropping from 11.1 percent to 9.7 percent.


Ohio Unemployment

Ohio UnemploymentOhio unemployment compensation claims are showing a general trend towards diminishing. Between March 2010 and August 2010, the unemployment rate fell from eleven percent to ten point three percent. Unlike other instances of unemployment data, this does not appear to be a case of individuals ceasing to be eligible to receive unemployment compensation, since the figures for individuals in the Civilian Labor Force, the number of individuals employed, and the volume of persons out of work, have all remained consistent from month to month over this six month period.

Throughout the state, the volume of mass layoffs have varied over the six months from March 2010 to August 2010 have changed drastically. In August was the least difficult month for individuals who lost their jobs. In August there were only 27 mass layoff events across all industries in the state, affecting just over 2,500 individuals. However, the previous month, July 2010, was the worst, with 87 mass layoff events resulting in more than 9,500 individuals. 

Seasonally adjusted, the largest number of jobs held in the state of Ohio is found in the Trade, Transportation, and Utilities industry. 

The number of Ohio unemployment compensation claims have, in terms of percentages, increased over this same six month period the most in the Construction industry, even after an adjustment has been made for seasonal turn over in the industry, which is especially surprising because the spring and summer months are usually a strong time for Construction companies.

Oregon State Unemployment

Oregon State Unemployment

 

The Oregon state unemployment rate has remained essentially unchanged over the six month period between March 2010 and August 2010. The Civilian Labor Force over that period varied from 1,954,000 thousand people to a height of 1,965,000 workers in May, before settling at 1,965,000 positions. The volume of employed individuals has remained consistently around 1,755,000 thousand individuals during this six month period. The number of unemployed people has also remained stable, hovering around 207,000 people. Due to the fact that the job market has remained stable, there has been little change in the Oregon state unemployment rate, which has been around 10.6 percent. This means that the Oregon state unemployment rate has been above the national unemployment rate over this six month period. 

There have been 155 instances of mass layoff across the 11 major job categories in Oregon State. Unemployment numbers from these layoffs have resulted in 17,018 people filing an initial claim to allow the collection of Oregon state unemployment benefits. 

Oregon state unemployment figures indicate that the vast majority of jobs in the state involve industries that are not farm jobs. There are nearly 1,600,000 jobs in the 11 non-farm job fields. These 11 categories of jobs are:

·Mining and logging

·Construction,

·Manufacturing

·Trade, Transportation and Utilities

·Information

·Financial Activities

·Professional and Business Services

·Education and Health Services

·Leisure and Hospitality

·Government Jobs

·and other services.

If you need legal advice and assistance, contact Oregon lawyers.

SC Unemployment

SC Unemployment

South Carolina unemployment statistics are collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Bureau of Labor Statistics is a division of the Department of Labor, one of the Cabinet level offices of the executive branch of the federal government of the United States of America. When the Bureau complies its report on SC unemployment, it looks are economic data from across the state, but specific attention is paid to the SC unemployment levels in and around the major metropolitan areas in the state and near its borders.

 

The only metropolitan areas that the Bureau uses to inform its report on SC unemployment that are not located entirely inside South Carolina are the Charlotte- Gastonia- Rock Hill metropolitan area, which involves part of North Carolina as well, and the Augusta- Richmond County metropolitan area that involves part of Georgia. 

 

A SC unemployment report is also influenced by metropolitan areas entirely in the state, such as the Anderson metropolitan area, the Charleston – North Charleston- Summerville metropolitan area, the Columbia metropolitan area, the Florence metropolitan area, the Greenville- Mauldin- Easley metropolitan area, the Myrtle Beach – North Myrtle Beach – Conway metropolitan area, the Spartanburg metropolitan area, and the Sumter metropolitan area.

 

The most recent information on SC unemployment levels indicates that both the SC unemployment rate and the size of the Civilian Workforce was varied wildly over the most recent six month period for which the information is available, March 2010 to August 2010. During this time the SC unemployment rate has swung from 12.2 percent in March to 10.7 percent in July. In the same months the workforce swung from 2 million 173.8 thousand people to 2 million 142.8 thousand people.

Tennessee Unemployment

Tennessee Unemployment

The most comprehensive report on Tennessee unemployment figures is compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, a part of the federal Department of Labor in the United States of America. A report on TN unemployment compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports on the unemployment data for specific metropolitan areas, as well as Tennessee unemployment data for the state as a whole.

The major metropolitan areas included in one of these TN unemployment reports focuses on the following metropolitan areas:

·         Chattanooga, TN- GA

·         Clarksville, TN- KY

·         Cleveland, TN

·         Jackson, TN

·         Johnson City, TN

·         Kingsport- Bristol- Bristol, TN- VA

·         Knoxville, TN

·         Memphis, TN- MS- AR

·         Morristown, TN

·         and Nashville- Davidson- Murfreesboro- Franklin, TN

When looking at a Tennessee unemployment report covering the state as a whole, it is easy to see that the unemployment rate for the most recent six month period for which information is available, March 2010 through August 2010, had declined a full percentage point from 10.6 percent in March to 9.6 percent in August. At the same time, the Civilian Labor Force has risen from 3,010,000 in March to 3,037,000 individuals in August. This means that the decline in the TN unemployment rate is not just due to individuals no longer qualifying for Tennessee unemployment benefits, but that instead that there were new positions being created.


Texas Unemployment

Texas Unemployment

The Texas Civilian Labor Force is the largest in the nation. It involves more than 12,100,000 individuals. The Texas unemployment rate has remained at either 8.2 percent or 8.3 percent. This stable level of Texas unemployment has meant that the Texas Unemployment Commission has only had to supply Texas unemployment benefits to approximately one million people each month for each of the six months between March 2010 and August 2010. This six month period is the most recent period for which information is available. 
More than 10 million of the positions which the Texas Unemployment Commission may be held responsible for involve Non-farm Wage and Salary positions. The Government sector is the single largest of these sectors, however since government jobs are relatively immune from the risk of high involuntary turnover, these positions present a minimum risk of contributing to the Texas unemployment rate. Behind government jobs the next segment that employs the most Texans is the Education and Health Care Services sector, although these districts also have a low risk of contributing to Texas unemployment.
The third largest sector of the Texas economy presents the largest risk of increasing the responsibility of the Texas Unemployment Commission. This sector is the Professional and Business Services sector. However, this sector seems to be relatively safe from contributing to an increase in Texas unemployment levels, possessing year over year growth in four of the six months between March and August 2010.

Utah Unemployment

Utah Unemployment

According to information compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which is a division of the Department of Labor of the United States of America, Unemployment in Utah has increased over the six month period between March 2010 and August 2010. In March, the Civilian Labor Force in Utah was just under 1,345,000 individuals. By August, the Civilian Labor Force in Utah had increased to 1,000,051 jobs. Over that same period, unemployment in Utah in March involved 97.5 thousand individuals, while unemployment in Utah by August had increased to 100.5 thousand people. 

There have been very few mass layoff events in the 11 major categories which the Bureau of Labor Statistics monitors. The 11 non-farm categories that the Division of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics monitors are:

·      Mining and logging

·      Construction,

·      Manufacturing

·      Trade, Transportation and Utilities

·      Information

·      Financial Activities

·      Professional and Business Services

·      Education and Health Services

·      Leisure and Hospitality

·      Government Jobs

·      and other services.


The Trade, Transportation, and Utilities industries are the largest employers in the state, followed closely by the Government. However, this gap is beginning to close, with the Government sector growing by almost one thousand jobs between March 2010 and August 2010, while the Trade, Transportation, and Utilities industries shed nearly as many jobs.

Virginia Unemployment

Virginia Unemployment

The Virginia Unemployment Commission is the state department that submits the reports on VA Unemployment levels that is released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. By utilizing the report from the Virginia Unemployment Commission, the Bureau, a part of the federal Department of Labor in the United States of America is able to publish a comprehensive report on the levels of VA unemployment across the state.

In addition to VA unemployment levels on a statewide basis, the Bureau of Labor Statistics is also able to break down VA unemployment report from the Virginia Unemployment Commission into separate reports that describe the different metropolitan areas in the state. These major metropolitan areas are:

·         the Blacksburg- Christiansburg- Radford metropolitan area,

·         the Charlottesville metropolitan area,

·         the Danville metropolitan area,

·         the Harrisonburg metropolitan area,

·         the Kingsport- Bristol- Bristol, TN- VA metropolitan area,

·         the Lynchburg metropolitan area,

·         the Richmond metropolitan area,

·         the Roanoke metropolitan area,

·         the Virginia Beach- Norfolk- Newport News, VA- NC metropolitan area,

·         the Washington- Arlington- Alexandria, DC- VA- MD- WV metropolitan area,

·         and the Winchester, VA- WV metropolitan area.

In addition, the Virginia Unemployment Commission also supplies information about statewide VA unemployment conditions. By looking at the VA unemployment reports for the six month period between March 2010 and August 2010, it can be seen that the unemployment rate dropped from 7.3 percent to a flat seven percent. However, this was accompanied by a loss of 11.3 thousand individuals in the civilian labor force, while the number of employed individuals only rose by 6.1 thousand jobs.


Washington State Unemployment

Washington State UnemploymentWashington state unemployment data indicates that Washington unemployment has remained below the national average for unemployment statistics. The WA unemployment rate during the period between March 2010 and August 2010 has declined by .6 percent, despite the fact that more than 25,000 jobs have been created during that time period. In March, the Washington state unemployment rate was 9.5, meaning that only 334.6 individuals out of the Civilian Labor Force of 3,518,000 people were out of work. 

A large proportion of the Civilian Labor Force in the state of Washington holds jobs in the farming industry. As of August 2010, the seasonally adjusted number of non-farm jobs in Washington state were 2,797,000 people. 

During the six month period between March and August 2010, there were 94,000 mass layoffs. These layoffs lead to 8,001 individuals filing an initial Washington unemployment claim. An initial WA unemployment claim means that the individual submitting the Washington State unemployment claim had not been collecting Washington unemployment insurance benefits before that month. 

In addition to Washington state unemployment data across the state, the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the Department of Labor also publishes WA unemployment data for 13 major metropolitan areas including Bellingham, Bremerton- Silverdale, Kennewick- Pasco- Richland, Longview, Mount Vernon- Anacortes, Olympia, Portland- Vancouver- Hillsboro, Seattle- Bellevue- Everett, Seattle-Tacoma- Bellevue, Spokane, Tacoma, Wenatchee- East Wenatchee, and Yakima.


Wisconsin Unemployment

Wisconsin Unemployment

Collecting unemployment data for the state of Wisconsin falls to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which is a division of the Cabinet level Department of Labor, which is in turn a part of the executive branch of the federal Government of the United States of America. In addition to collecting WI unemployment and job data, the Bureau of Labor Statistics is also responsible for unemployment and job data for the entire country.

 

When the Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes reports which address WI unemployment, its reports are published in relation to both statewide figures and major metropolitan areas. When publishing WI unemployment data, there are 15 metropolitan areas which the Bureau of Labor Statistics focuses upon. However, only 10 of these metropolitan areas are located entirely in the state of Wisconsin, meaning that these reports cannot be used to fully understand the issue of WI unemployment. These other metropolitan areas affecting WI unemployment data are spread throughout the neighboring states.

 

The most recent six month period for which KS unemployment information from the Bureau of Labor statistics is available is for March 2010 through August 2010. Throughout this period, the unemployment rate has fallen or remained in each month. At the same time, the work force has declined in five of these six months, April through August. The number of individuals eligible to collect WI unemployment benefits also fell in five of these six months (March through July).