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Understanding The US Trade Representative

Understanding The US Trade Representative

The Office of the US Trade Representative is an important agency within the Executive Office of the President. The Office of the US Trade Representative has, as its purpose, an advisory position with regard to trade negotiations and trade policy. In other words, the Office of the US Trade Representative is meant to advise the executive branch on matters of trading and trade policy. The trade in question is trade with over nations and countries. 
The Office of the US Trade Representative is thus an office which is very much concerned with foreign and international affairs, particularly as one of the primary functions of the Office of the US Trade Representative is to provide the Special 301 Report every year for the executive branch. The Special 301 Report of the Office of the US Trade Representative is a report which is meant to establish those nations that are regarded as unfavorable markets for American trade and business. Reasons for such a distinction include:limited access and an inadequate observance of human rights.
The Special 301 Report of the Office of the US Trade Representative also has a particular emphasis upon how the nations in question treat intellectual property rights. The executive branch can then take the recommendations made by the Office of the US Trade Representative under advisement when it is determining the trading policy for the nation as a whole.

Economic Recovery Advisory Board Overview

Economic Recovery Advisory Board Overview

The President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board is a very recent creation within the executive branch of the United States federal government. The President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board was created on February 6 of 2009 by President Barack Obama in order to provide the President and other members of the executive branch with information concerning the recent economic recession and its effects, and ways to combat those effects.
The President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board is thus a specific response to these circumstances, and thus the President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board is currently slated to exist for a total of two years. The exact success of the President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board will determine whether or not its existence is prolonged by the executive branch for any further amount of time.
The President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board was designed to include advisers who were not associated with the government prior to becoming members of the President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board, and it was also designed to ensure that these experts spanned a wide variety of different subjects in their expertise. The reigning idea behind the President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board was thus to provide the executive branch and the President with ideas and information from sources which might not have normally been heard within the federal government.
The President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board has not been without criticism so far, particularly in that its efficacy remains yet to be determined, as the economic recession might have abated somewhat, but it is currently not certain whether this is due to the efforts of the President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board or even of the executive branch in general.

The Intelligence Advisory Board

The Intelligence Advisory Board

The President’s Intelligence Advisory Board is an organization within the executive branch of the government which acts in an advisory role to the President of the United States. The President’s Intelligence Advisory Board is meant to provide the President with important information and advice concerning the intelligence activities of the United States, particularly in terms of what intelligence has been gathered, how intelligence has been gathered, analysis of gathered intelligence, and concerns regarding counterintelligence operations.
The President’s Intelligence Advisory Board  was originally founded in 1956 by an executive order from President Dwight D. Eisenhower, though its name was different at the time. The original purpose of the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board was similar to the function for which it is used today, as it was meant to provide the President with important information regarding intelligence.
The Intelligence Oversight Board was a particular entity within the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board which was formed on the executive order of President Gerald Ford with something of a mandate to examine and investigate potential abuses and breaches of the law by clandestine organizations within the American government.
This means that the original purpose of the executive order passed by President Ford which led to the creation of the Intelligence Oversight Board was to ensure that intelligence agencies were not overstepping boundaries in the pursuit of their purposes. President George W. Bush terminated this element of the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board in 2008 by executive order.

Understanding The Role Of The Chief of Staff

Understanding The Role Of The Chief of Staff

 
 
The White House Chief of Staff is a critical member of the Executive Office of the President. The White House Chief of Staff is specifically considered to be the most powerful member of the Executive Office underneath the President, as the White House Chief of Staff acts as the President's primary aide and adviser on many different matters.
 
 
The role of the White House Chief of Staff is not set in stone, however, as the exact duties and functions which the White House Chief of Staff may perform will likely vary from White House administration to White House administration. In general, however, the White House Chief of Staff is responsible for a number of duties such as managing much of the rest of the Executive Office of the President, and managing important segments of the President's time. 
 
 
The White House Chief of Staff will likely be responsible for selecting some of the most important members of the Executive Office of the President on behalf of the President himself, as the White House Chief of Staff will in many ways work with such individuals on a more regular basis than might the President.
 
 
Furthermore, the White House Chief of Staff will likely determine exactly how the infrastructure of the White House staff will function for the administration in question, and the White House Chief of Staff will likely determine who gets access to the Oval Office for speaking with the President. The White House Chief of Staff will also often conduct negotiations with Congress on the behalf of the President.
 

Congressional Budget Office

Congressional Budget Office


The Congressional Budget Office is an administration which is designed to provide Congress with important information concerning economic decisions. The Congressional Budget Office was created in 1974, as part of the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974. The Congressional Budget Office essentially facilitates the creation of the federal budget by performing the necessary projections of how much money the federal government is likely to have for the budget.

Furthermore, the Congressional Budget Office is responsible for calculating the overall national debt, as well as calculating any effect that decisions concerning the budget might have on national debt. The Congressional Budget Office director is appointed by Congress, and he or she remains in the office for four years before the office is reappointed. 

The Congressional Budget Office is specifically separate from the Office of Management and Budget, which is a Cabinet office within the executive branch of the government. The Congressional Budget Office is, as the name would suggest, associated with Congress and thus the legislative branch of government.

The Office of Management and Budget is considered the largest office within the entirety of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, which is significant as the Executive Office contains many other important offices. The Office of Management and Budget performs much the same functions as the Congressional Budget Office, but does so on behalf of the President, in order to assist with any decisions to be made about the budget.

 

Executive Power Explained

Executive Power Explained

The vesting clause of any Article of the Constitution is the clause under which executive power is vested into a specific body or group. The First Article of the Constitution has a vesting clause giving power to Congress, in the form of the Senate and the House of Representatives. The Third Article of the Constitution has a vesting clause giving power to a single Supreme Court.
In the Second Article of the Constitution, the body vested with power is the President of the United States of America. The President, unlike either of the other two bodies designed as recipients of vesting clauses in other Articles of the Constitution, is a single individual, given full executive powers.
The executive powers given to the President in the vesting clause include a number of different elements, most of which are described in Section 2 of the Second Article. The first of the executive powers described is command of the military. The President is given power by the Constitution as the Commander in Chief of the Army and the Navy of the United States of America. Though this is less significant now, he is also given power as the commander of the militia of the states, when the militia is actually rounded up. Though the President does have executive powers as Commander in Chief, however, he does not have the power to declare war.
Another of the executive powers granted to the President is the ability to have any leading officer of any executive department submit a report to the President in writing, thereby giving the President power to command these officers to advise him. This is the executive power that creates the Cabinet, effectively.
The President is given the executive power to grant pardons or reprieves, with the exception that this executive power does not extend over situations of impeachment; a President does not have executive powers to pardon himself.
Yet another one of the executive powers given to the President is that he can ratify treaties, though this power is restricted, as it requires the President to obtain approval from the Senate. Treaties, in this sense, refers to international agreements, though treaties are only one type of international agreement possible.
There are some types of international agreement, known as sole-executive agreements, which require only the approval of the President. But executive powers concerning treaties, specifically, do require the President to obtain a two thirds approval from the Senate before ratifying the treaty in question.
The President is given executive powers concerning the appointment of a large number of public officials, including judges and ambassadors. These approvals do require the approval of the Senate, as well, but the President is thus given executive powers to appoint any officers whose appointment is not specifically defined elsewhere in the Constitution. The President is also given executive powers to appoint public officials of a lower level without needing to obtain the approval of the Senate.
Finally, the President is given executive powers to make recess appointments. A recess appointment is an appointment to a senior federal position without the approval of the Senate, because the Senate is in recess at the time that the appointment is made. All recess appointments still have to be approved by the Senate by the end of the next session of Congress, and as such, the Senate can undue the President’s recess appointments.
 

Executive Branches

Executive Branches

The executive branch of government, in general, is considered to the part of any given government which is given primary authority and power over the government in question. In monarchies throughout history, for example, the King would hold all the power of the executive branch of government, and indeed, there might be nothing else but an executive branch of government.
In the system of government used by the United States of America, the executive branch of government is simply one of three different branches of government, with the powers of government divided between these three branches for the sake of ensuring a separation of power. The President of the United States is the key office of the executive branch of government, with the powers of the executive branch of government being invested into the President by Article II of the Constitution. 
The executive branch of government in America is also seen as containing the number of offices and departments that function below the President of the United States. All of these departments and offices technically are held responsible to the President, and function on the President’s authority, but they are considered by some to be different enough to characterize the executive branch of government as being embodied in multiple offices.
These offices which make up the executive branch of government and advice or carry out the will of the President include the offices of the Cabinet, such as the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Treasury, the Secretary of Defense, and the Attorney General.

What Does The President of The United States Of America Do

What Does The President of The United States Of America Do

The President of the United States of America is always a single individual in who are invested the powers of the executive branch of government. The President of the United States of America is considered, according to the system of government in America, to be both the head of state and the head of government for America, which means that the President of the United States of America is both the head of the executive branch of government, and the head of the government as a whole.
The powers granted to the President of the United States of America are actually somewhat more limited than one might initially imagine, though they are certainly by no means insignificant. The President of the United States of America is considered the commander-in-chief for the armed forces of the United States of America, though there are some limitations on exactly what the President of the United States of America can do in his or her position as President. 
The President of the United States of America is given the power to create and implement treaties with foreign nations, the power to grant pardons to criminal individuals, the power to appoint officers within specific positions, and the power to veto or sign bills from Congress.
The President of the United States does not, technically, have any additional power over the functions or operations of Congress besides that veto capability, but in modern times, the President of the United States of America has come to hold significant power over the legislative agenda of his or her particular political party, thus granting him or her significant power over the direction of Congressional legislation.

Look Into The White House

Look Into The White House

The White House, as a term, can sometimes be used to refer to the executive branch of the government of the United States of America, but it more appropriately refers to the building which acts as the home and office of the President of the United States of America. The address of the White House is 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, in Washington, D.C.
The White House, which was initially constructed in 1800, has since gone through many changes, as it was burned down, rebuilt, and expanded upon significantly over time. The White House is now a large structure holding a number of different important elements, such as the Executive Residence, the Cabinet Room, the West Wing, and the East Wing. The White House is a six story building, and covers 55,000 square feet of space, with 132 rooms, 35 bathrooms, three elevators, a swimming pool, a putting green, a movie theater, and more. 
The Oval Office is housed in the West Wing of the White House, and is the official office from which the President of the United States conducts his state business. The Oval Office was first built and used by President William Howard Taft, in 1909, though this Oval Office is not the same exact Oval Office which is used by the President today. The Oval Office, much like the White House, is sometimes used as a term to represent the President himself. The Oval Office itself is generally redesigned to at least an aesthetic and cosmetic extent by each President to come into the White House.

Understanding The National Drug Control Policy

Understanding The National Drug Control Policy

The Office of National Drug Control Policy is another important office held within the Cabinet of the Executive Office of the President of the United States. The purpose of the Office of National Drug Control Policy is, appropriately enough, to create and enforce the policies of the executive branch with reference to drugs, encompassing all aspects, including usage, creation, and trafficking.
The Office of National Drug Control Policy was established as a consequence of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act in 1988 with this purpose in mind. The Office of National Drug Control Policy has not been without its criticism, however, as the organization has been seen to have a limited amount of success in actually preventing or eliminating overall drug use in America. 
The Office of National Drug Control Policy cites statistics such as the fact that youth drug use is down from 19.4% in 2001 to 14.8% in 2007, but these figures are often not enough for the lawmakers and politicians who work in the federal government. The Office of National Drug Control Policy has thus been the subject of relatively intense scrutiny and judgment, to determine if it is adequately performing its job, and if it should continue to receive funding.
There have been some propositions involving the transfer of programs and elements of the Office of National Drug Control Policy to other elements of the federal government. Furthermore, there have been some controversies around the actual methods utilized by the Office of National Drug Control Policy.