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Senate Vote Facts Overview

Senate Vote Facts Overview

The Senate is one of the houses that fall under the governing body of Congress.  Senate votes are important when it comes to passing bills and granting various powers through a legislative procedure. When it comes to senate votes, each senator is allowed one vote on a respective issue. Often if the body cannot reach a majority vote or if a division is called, a re-vote can be done. 
A senate vote comes around during times when bills are being brought to Congress in order to get passed and become pieces of legislation. Various bills come through to Congress in response to disasters that have happened in and outside of the United States, as well as bills regarding issues that affect a fair number of citizens. When a senate vote occurs, this is because the bill has been looked over, and is in proper condition for a vote. Recent votes in the Senate’s past are for Haiti relief funds, cash for clunkers, and various other bills. 
One important thing regarding the Senate and voting is Senate voting records. Senate voting records are meticulously kept in order to refer back to and for public record. This is a way that the American public can see how their senators are voting, and can address them if they desire a change. Senate voting records can be found through government websites, and have comprehensive information. The bills passed by the Senate, and subsequently congress affect a number of individuals the United States.

The Congress Vote Database Defined

The Congress Vote Database Defined

One of the most important things for the American public and Congress is to be able to have transparency and accessibility to one another, in order to have Congress represent the American public in the best way possible. One tool that allows for the public to be able to see how Congress has voted, and in particular, look at how their respective senators are voting is the Congress Votes Database. A Congress Votes Database compiles all of the recent votes for particular bills and amendments and makes them accessible to the public. 
This accessibility allows for the public to be able to see how the senators and the House has been voting. It is important, because if enough individuals are in a disagreement with how a senator is voting, they can file formal complaints and requests to have the senator start voting the way they want. 
Regarding senators, the senate voting records are a separate and public document in which individuals from the American public can look up the voting record of their respective senators. This is a more direct route to finding out how the senator has been voting. A senate voting record is kept for each senator, and it spans back several years, on order to show all of the votes, and what changes, if any, the senator made overtime. This is helpful when it comes to understand the belief system the senator holds about his or her particular region in the United States.

Electoral vote 2008

Electoral vote 2008
When it comes to voting for the President of the United States there are two specific types of voting that go on there is a popular vote and a vote of the electoral college. Popular votes are the ones which are polled around the nation and are essentially the vote of the states. The electoral college vote is the vote from the those elected to the electoral college. Throughout numerous elections there have only bee 538 electors for each election.

When it came to the 2008 election, there was great anticipation to see who would be the President of the United States. the popular vote 2008 was watched closely by a number of individuals around the nation. As the votes were tallied and the popular vote 2008 marker moved up, individuals where anxious to see the outcome. However, it is important to understand that the electoral vote 2008 was the more important vote to have by the body.

The electoral vote 2008 was out of 538 electoral college members; of the Obama had received 365 of these votes, while John McCain had only gotten 173. Overall, this made the popular vote 2008 and the electoral vote 2008 reflective of the same conclusion, that President Obama was the next choice as head of the United States of America. In some cases, the electoral vote and the popular vote do not match up, and in that instance it is the electoral vote that gets the win.

Getting to Know The Voting Systems

Getting to Know The Voting Systems
Voting systems are an important part of the government, politics, and business. These are the ways in which decisions are made regarding who is thought to be a good candidate or what group would best service a particular area. There are many different types of voting systems that can be named.

One of the most popular types of voting systems is a single transferable vote which has the power that is usually given to electors or a body of officials who are nominated to do the voting for a specific purpose. What a single transferable vote does is it is a voting system in which electors vote on candidates running for a specific position. As the candidates are weaned down, those who voted on ones who were kicked out of the race, are allowed to move their vote over to the candidate that they preferred who is left.

The early vote system is another system that is used regarding voting for localizes elections and elections of officials. Ballots can be submitted through the mail in order to complete early voting. This is often done with individuals who do not have access to a voting poll or are working during the election time. This is also done with voters who are not going to be in the state during voting time.

The voting systems are primarily ballot system or electronic ballots. Often they are held in accessible public areas are require valid identification in order to register to vote. For those doing absentee votes, this has to be done through the proper associations.

Understanding Instant Runoff Voting

Understanding Instant Runoff Voting
Instant runoff voting is a system that is used in order to find one clear winner in an election or through the voting process. For the sake of simplicity, we will use this as a model for electing a candidate to a political position. A ballot is created and the candidates who are running are put on the ballot. In the first round of the instant runoff vote, the candidates are ranked in order of preference.

What this means is if there are five candidates, they will be ranked 1 through 5 by the voters. After this the ballots are tallied up to find out if there is a winner. If there is no clear majority, the candidate who has the lowest ranking scores are eliminated from the ballot. So, if two people are eliminated from the ballot, it is then a four person ballot.  

The instant runoff voting resumes with the four person ballot; the voters again vote for their preferences and the ballots are counted and ranked again. Once all of the votes are counted and there is a clear winner, the instant runoff vote is over. This method is used when it comes to finding individuals to fill positions on committees or boards, if there are multiple candidates running.

Instant runoff voting is a type of voting that is typically done in smaller areas of decisions, more in local regions. One can surmise that the reason it is not used in larger elections is because this type of voting system would take too long to count the ballots.

Electoral Votes 2008

Electoral Votes 2008
The electoral college is the formal body that votes for the President and the Vice President of the United States. This body is made up of elected officials; the officials often promise to vote for one particular party or candidate, but ultimately they are allowed to pick whichever candidate they feel would be the best person for the job.

In the United States there has been for always 40 years a standard in which there have been 538 members of the electoral college. These members are broken down into different numbers of representatives from each state. For example the states of Vermont, Alaska, and Wyoming each has three electoral college votes done by their respective electors. Georgia, New Jersey, and North Carolina were each given 15 electors and subsequently 15 electoral college votes. The state with the most electoral college votes was California with 55.

The electoral college votes are the second grouping of votes done during an election. When the 2008 election came around, most of the nation was focused on the popular votes; these are the votes in which the public did; the ones that were updated every few minutes throughout the night. While this was going on, the electoral votes 2008 were being done. The electoral votes 2008 were the votes that officially elected the President and Vice President of the United States. Overall, electoral college votes are extremely important when it comes to choosing the future figureheads of the United States.

What Are Voting Booth

What Are Voting Booth
One of the most important things to ensure during an election is that the secrecy of the ballot and the privacy of an voter’s time voting is not infringed upon. In order to ensure the secrecy and privacy of voting, often public locations hosting an election and voting night will have a voting booth or a voting machine. A voting booth is a booth that can be enclosed from all sides, and is where the actual voting occurs.

The most common type of voting booth around is one that has three hard walls, and has a curtain for entry. These are almost always temporary booths, and can be brought to a public location in large quantities. There, a voter can get into the booth and cast the vote without having to worry about others being able to see who they pick. The actual voting system within a voting booth varies.

A voting booth can have a table where a voter can mark on a paper ballot and the deposit it. This is a common type of voting procedure. However, there are also voting machines that are used in these voting booths as well. A voting machine takes the information of an individual, and records the vote as well. This ensures that no one else can find out who the voter voted for. In many cases, these types of machines also have a clear security cover on top of the screen, in order to obstruct the information for others who could potentially see it.

Voting Quick Overview

Voting Quick Overview

 

Voting is a system in which individuals and officials are able to make formal decisions regarding political power and governmental acts. 

Voting Background

Voting is a method of decision making that is done through the use of formal ballots being taken in order to define a clear winner of a bill, group, or a candidate. 

Swing Vote

The swing vote is one of the most important votes that a candidate can get during an election. This vote comes from a person or group that is either not affiliated with a party, or is affiliated with a party, but chooses to vote for the other candidate. This type of vote is often indicative of the outcome of the election. 

Rock the Vote

Rock the vote is an organization that is devoted to educating and sparking interest in young voters, in order to build up the voter numbers during elections. 

Senate Vote

The senate is one of the bodies of congress, and it often sees a number of different bills and issues that are brought to the floor. A senator’s vote is supposed to reflect his or her constituency.

Congress Votes Database

Congress votes database is a website that is devoted to compiling and housing all of the votes that have passed through congress and is accessible to the American public. 

Popular Vote vs. Electoral Vote

The popular vote is the vote of the American public. The electoral vote is a vote that is done by elected officials, and is the vote which formally picks the President and Vice President.

Popular Vote

The popular vote is the other portion of the overall voting for the President and Vice President. This was established in the Constitution, in order to give the American public power to vote. 

Prop 8 Vote

The Prop 8 vote was a vote that was passed in 2008, in order to ban gay marriage in the state of California. In 2010, Prop 8 was brought back up in legislature, for repeal. 

Bailout Vote

The Bailout bill was a proposition that was brought to Congress. This bailout was for $26.1 Billion and would be used to stimulate the economy and help the nation during the struggle of the economic collapse. When it came to the floor of the Senate, the senate voted to pass this bill. 

Voting systems

Voting systems are particular types of systems used for various voting needs. Systems like early voting and single transferable voting, are often common methods. 

Instant Runoff Voting

Instant Runoff voting is a preferential system in which candidates are ranked and the top candidates move on to a next round of voting until there is a clear winner.

Electoral Votes 2008

The electoral votes of 2008 were the votes of the electoral college body; these voters were the individuals who elected the President by a majority. 

Voting Booth 

A voting booth is a private booth in which voters are allowed to enter in order to make their ballot selection in secret. Sometimes there is a voting machine within the booth to make the choice electronically. 

Voting Records

Voting records are records kept by the state or by the nation. This is a way in which the government keeps track of the votes that have been done, and how politicians have voted in the past.

All About The Rock the Vote

All About The Rock the Vote
Rock the Vote is a non-profit, non-partisan organization that was created over two decades ago. The goal of the Rock the Vote organization is to create interest in voting and give individuals all the tools necessary in order to become informed voters.

The Rock the Vote campaign came about as a response to the results of declining polls each year during various electoral junctures. The declining polls were troubling to those in government and to those who support the government.

To stop the decline and build up a better base of younger voters, the organization came together to bring news, music and various other media together to reach younger voters. When television channels like MTV were turned on, celebrities were advocating to each voter in the audience the importance of getting interested, informed and involved in voting.

The movement has become substantial after two decades and has generated interest in millions of young voters to go out, get educated, and vote on behalf of their generation. One of the times in which the Rock the Vote campaign gains significant media is during election time for the President of the United States.



This is where a new group of young voters are called to action, to get registered and vote to make a change, and to be a proactive part of history. Overall, the Rock the Vote campaign is one of the most important movements that have come about regarding creating interested and enthusiastic voters.

Understanding Popular Vote

Understanding Popular Vote

The Second Article of the Constitution establishes the electoral college as a system of indirect popular voting in order to elect the President of the United States.
This system is differentiated from a system based upon direct popular vote in that it is possible for a presidential candidate to win the popular vote, while losing the actual election. The Constitution separates citizen voters from the actual election for the President in order to prevent a tyranny of the majority, among other aims. 
When the Founding Fathers were developing the Constitution, they had to deal with certain facts of the day and age. A direct system, based only on popular vote, seemed unfeasible for practical reasons, including a lack of organization for the political system, coupled with issues concerning the speed of communication.
At the time, there were not political parties, and there was no clear system for determining how many candidates could run for President. There was some fear on the part of the Constitution’s framers that a huge number of candidates would run, and with a direct, popular vote as determinant for election, it might be possible for a single party to receive more votes than any other candidate, while still only receiving a fraction of the overall votes, as each different area of people would vote for a more local candidate.
Furthermore, because taking the vote of every single person, and then tabulating them all together, would take large amounts of time using the technology of the era, a direct popular vote seemed unfeasible. Thus, when writing the Constitution, the framers decided to use an indirect system.  
The indirect system of the electoral college, as established in the Constitution, is still, in theory, a system based on a popular vote. Each citizen still gets one vote in the election. But the difference is that no citizen is actually voting for the President directly. Instead, each citizen is voting for an elector, effectively nominating a representative.
This representative elector will then actually vote for the President. Each state only gets a certain number of electors, based on the population of that state. This ensures that citizens are voting for the President indirectly, as they are voting for an elector who would vote for the same presidential candidate for whom each citizen him or herself would vote.
This system of voting established by the Constitution is still a form of popular vote, as in the end, theoretically, the popular vote of the people will still play the primary, determining role in the actual vote for the President. But this system of voting insulates the vote from the popular sentiment of the people, ensuring that there will be no tyranny of the majority, which was another concern of the Founding Fathers.
This can be understood especially well if one were to imagine a popular vote today, as major population centers would have tremendously more power than sparser areas of the country, and thus, the majority might tyrannize the minority.
Furthermore, the indirect voting system established by the Constitution also represents the fact that, while Congressional representatives are voted for through popular vote, the President and Vice President are instead elected as the leaders of a federation of states, and as such, are effectively voted for by each state, instead of by the people as a whole. The system is strongly ingrained in American politics, even though it has been modified from its originally stated form in the Constitution.
The system has been considered generally functional, especially as candidates have only twice, in the history of the nation, won the popular vote, but lost the electoral vote. In both instances, the popular vote was extremely close.